TONIGHT. PAULDING VILLAGE COUNCIL MEETING. ATTENDANCE REQUESTED.

PLEASE ATTEND THE COUNCIL MEETING TONIGHT AT THE VILLAGE OFFICES IF YOU

ARE CONCERNED AS MUCH OF MANY OF THE MEMBERS OF OUR COMMUNITY ARE

ABOUT THE RECENT ACTIONS OF THE MAYOR, HE SHOULD RESIGN, AND THE INABILITY

OF THE ADMINISTRATION TO EMPLOYEE A NEW ADMINISTRATOR. WE NEED SOME

MATURE GROWNUPS IN THE CONVERSATION.

 

 

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Paulding Progress Reports ODOT Resurfacing Project In Paulding

 

US 127 repaving in Paulding to begin soon
Melinda Krick, Editor
Thursday, August 11, 2016 5:45 PM
From Paulding Progress Website

PAULDING – Ohio Department of Transportation (ODOT) District 1 in Lima said lateThursday that paving on U.S. 127 in Paulding will likely begin the week of Aug. 22.

 

Gerken Paving of Napoleon won the bid for for paving portions of U.S. 127 and Ohio 111 in Paulding.

Many residents and motorists have been complaining about the rough condition of 127 (North Williams Street) since crews completed a sewer separation project on the thoroughfare late last year.

The project description, included in ODOT’s construction list for 2016, specifies the location as U.S. 127 from Jackson Street to Garfield Avenue, and on Ohio 111 from Cherry Street to U.S. 127. Work is to include performing necessary pavement repairs, resurfacing with asphalt concrete, constructing curb ramps and placing pavement markings.

Traffic is to be maintained during construction.
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Ohio Ethics Commission

Investigation
Our Investigation section is responsible for investigating alleged violations of the Ohio Ethics Law and related statutes and refers cases supported by substantial evidence for prosecution or alternative resolution.

You may contact an Ethics Commission Special Investigator at (614) 466-7090 to determine whether or not your allegation falls within the authority of the Commission, as defined in Ohio’s Ethics Law. Once this determination is made, the Investigator will mail to you an Allegation Form to be completed and returned to the Commission.

The Investigative Process
Penalties for Violation
I. Financial Disclosure

Failing to file a financial disclosure statement in violation of R.C. section 102.02(C) is a fourth-degree misdemeanor criminal offense, punishable by a fine of up to $250 and/or a maximum of 30 days in jail. See R.C. sections 102.99(A); 2929.21. In addition, the Ethics Commission is required to assess a late filing fee equal to $10 per day, up to a maximum late fee of $250. See R.C. section 102.02(F).

Filing a false financial disclosure statement in violation of R.C. section 102.02(D) is a first-degree misdemeanor criminal offense, punishable by a fine of up to $1000 and/or a maximum of 6 months in jail. See R.C. sections 102.99(A); 2929.21.

II. Conflict of Interest

Violations of R.C. sections 102.03, 102.04 and 102.07 are first-degree misdemeanor criminal offenses, punishable by a fine of up to $1000 and/or a maximum of 6 months in jail. See R.C. sections 102.99(B); 2929.21.

III. Unlawful Interest in a Public Contract

Violations of R.C. sections 2921.42(A)(1) and 2921.42(A)(2) are fourth-degree felony criminal offenses, punishable by a fine of up to $5000 and/or a maximum of 18 months in prison. See R.C. sections 2921.42(E); 2929.14; 2929.18.

Violations of R.C. sections 2921.42(A)(3) through (A)(5) are first degree misdemeanor criminal offenses, punishable by a fine of up to $1000 and/or a maximum of 6 months in jail. See R.C. sections 2921.42(E); 2929.21.

IV. Soliciting or Receiving Improper Compensation

Violations of R.C. section 2921.43 are first-degree misdemeanor criminal offenses, punishable by a fine of up to $1000 and/or a maximum of 6 months in jail. See R.C. sections 2921.43(D); 2929.21.

In addition, a public servant who is convicted of a violation of R.C. section 2921.43 is disqualified from holding any public office, employment, or position of trust in this state for a period of seven years from the date of conviction. See R.C. section 2921.43(E).

Ohio Ethics Commission Authority

Building A Vibrant Community

Vibrant Downtowns Key to Community Development
August 4, 2016 at 10:39am by Caitlin Jones

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Prior to World War II, many communities in the U.S. were centered around downtowns for living, shopping, entertainment and work. The quintessential downtown was typically home to a bank, a post office, government offices, a library, clothing stores, a music store, a cinema, a grocery and a diner. Most of the buildings offered apartments on the second, third and fourth floors. Downtowns were the hearts of communities.

Since the post-war suburban boom, downtowns have changed and continue to evolve. With the emergence of shopping centers, malls, one-stop shops and improved transportation, many of the small businesses lining the downtown streets have been forced to close. Downtowns all over America lost that spark that made them special, some turning into local government offices, some with a few shops and a lot of boarded buildings. In some places, they have been completely abandoned as neglect and apathy took over. In the age of 70 mile per hour highways, constant sales and advertising, Internet shopping, and an always-on-the-go mindset, the glory days of downtowns are lost on many.

Many communities, however, have not given up on the importance of downtowns in community development. Many of these communities have joined Main Street America, an organization dedicated to revitalizing downtowns in a way that does not damage the historic integrity while ensuring economic vitality. Many communities in Ohio including Cleveland, Delaware, Greenville, Medina, Portsmouth, Van Wert, Wooster and others have become accredited Main Street America programs. The Main Street Approach is used by member programs to provide structure and stability to the revitalization efforts of downtowns. The approach includes inputs, transformative strategies and outputs.

Jeff Speck, an urban planner and designer, has determined that the singular factor of community success is walkability, which is best accomplished in the downtown area of communities. In his 2012 book, Walkable City: How Downtown Can Save America, One Step at a Time, Speck writes, “The General Theory of Walkabilty explains how, to be favored, a walk has to satisfy four main conditions: it must be useful, safe, comfortable, and interesting.” Speck explains how decisions have long-lasting and far-reaching effects and what decisions need to be made to have such effects on downtowns.

Communities across the nation have seen the positive impacts a thriving downtown has on community development. If you believe your downtown could use a little TLC, suggest to your community development leaders consider strategies for revitalizing your downtown.

Revitalizing downtowns is not a ‘flavor of the month’ experiment, but rather a proven means to developing communities and stimulating local business. Additionally, revitalizing downtowns into walkable community areas will improve community health.

Check out Speck’s books and his TED Talk, contact Main Street America, and be sure to look over the variety of ready-to-use tools created by OSU Extension, UWEX, and University of Minnesota Extension that can be used to create vibrant downtowns.

Caitlin Jones is the Program Coordinator for OSU Extension Community Development in Van Wert County & the Maumee Valley EERA.

Posted in Sustainable Communities Tagged Business Retention & Expansion, Community Planning, economic development, economic opportunity, small business, Van Wert Ohio Bookmark the permalink.

Abuse Of Power Grounds For Recall Election

Abuse of power

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Abuse of power, in the form of “malfeasance in office” or “official misconduct,” is the commission of an unlawful act, done in an official capacity, which affects the performance of official duties. Malfeasance in office is often grounds for a for cause removal of an elected official by statute or recall election. Abuse of power can also mean a person using the power they have for their own personal gain.

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